More About “Mission”

A recent post listed and defined many words containing the element mit and miss and descended from the Latin verb mittere, meaning “send.” This follow-up offers related words not as easily discerned as being part of the mittere family.

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3 Easy Ways to Write More Concisely

Writers can employ various categorical strategies to make their writing more active and concise. Here are three simple types of unnecessary wording to keep in mind (and out of one’s writing).

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The Prefix “Hyper” and Related Words

Words with the Greek prefix hyper– (meaning “above,” “beyond,” or “over”) are listed and defined in this post. (A subsequent post will focus on words with the antonymic prefix hypo.)

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Missions and Omissions

The words listed and defined in this post all stem from the Latin verb mittere, which means “send.” They have in common the element mit (or miss).

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3 Types of Misplaced Modifiers

Poor placement within sentences of words that provide details can hamper comprehension. Take care to avoid the various types of pitfalls demonstrated in the following examples, which are followed by discussion and a revision.

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3 Cases of Inconsistent Wording in Lists

Whether items are listed in line (within a sentence) or vertically, the syntactical structure of the items should be consistent. In the following three examples, discussion and revision illustrate this point.

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Memory and Memorials

This post lists and defines the words derived from the Latin term memor, which means “mindful of.”

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3 Examples of Mismatched Inflectional Endings

When verbs serve parallel functions within a sentence, they should be treated with the same inflectional ending (-s/-es, -ed, or -ing) or should both have no inflectional ending at all. In each of the following examples, discussions explain this point in greater detail, and revisions illustrate adherence to this rule.

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