Finding, Founding, and Funding

Find, found, and fund could conceivably be related on the basis of the notion of obtaining something, but the words (except in the case of the link between find and one of three broad senses of found) stem from independent sources. This post defines these words and others derived from them.

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  • Mark Nichol on
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Vocabulary Quiz #10: US Slang

As a result of the popularity of police drama in U.S. entertainment, many words associated with criminal activity have become common in general usage. Edit the sentences below replacing the slang term with the appropriate standard English word.

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Top 10 Websites for Book Lovers

There is something magical about reading books. Whether you like fiction or non-fiction, fantasy or sci-fi, there are many books out there.

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5 Examples of Repetition and Redundancy

In each of the following sentences, repetition of words or phrases or redundant use of similar terms is easily eliminated, as described in the explanations and shown in the revisions that follow each example.

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  • Mark Nichol on
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Tradition and Treason

Curiously, a word referring to the handing down of beliefs and customs and one pertaining to a breakdown in fidelity to a political system, which is based on beliefs and customs, though they are not antonyms, have a common etymology. This post discusses these words and several others with the same ancestor.

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Zero and Its Synonyms

The word zero has a small but distinctive set of synonyms, which are listed in this post. Zero is the word for the symbol 0, representing the absence of magnitude or quantity and the value between positive and negative numbers. The word also represents the lowest point or the starting point for measurement or, as […]

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Take a Stand for Language Standards

English usage is always evolving, but the rate of evolution seems to accelerate all the time, and careful observers will note in a wide variety of content pervasive examples of the relaxation of standards for written English. This post discusses several categories in which it appears that even professional writers often seem unaware of basic precepts of good writing.

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Visions and Visits

Vision and visit both pertain to seeing something, and that’s no coincidence, because they are cognates, both stemming from the Latin verb videre, meaning “see.” A discussion of the words, their variations, and some related terms follows.

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Political Terms Dominate New Dictionary Entries

Dictionary.com’s newest set of entries to its lexicon, and some revised definitions for existing terms, reflect the politically themed discourse that has dominated the media over the past year. This post shares and defines some of those terms.

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How to Treat Complex Phrasal Adjectives

Numerous DailyWritingTips.com posts have addressed hyphenation of phrasal adjectives such as “long range” when they precede a noun, as in “long-range missile.” But what about when the phrasal adjective includes more than two words? As this post explains, it depends on the interrelationships of those words.

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