One of Few Who Are

Each of the following quotations contains a grammatical error: This process is one of several that is required to maintain nuclear SREBP1-c at very low levels… –Yeshiva University website

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Inflecting OK

A reader stumbled on the word OKing in the following: Owners of eight rooftop clubs abutting Wrigley Field sued to overturn city approval of the $375 million plan to rebuild the aging ballpark, saying the city broke its own rules in OKing the plan and effectively deprived them of their property rights without due process.

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Venerate

This odd use of the verb venerate occurs on a funeral home website: Prior to the age of photography, death masks were used to venerate the death.

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Landscape

A reader asks: What is the meaning and usage of landscape in [phrases] like ‘emerging media landscape’ or ‘emerging distribution landscape’?

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Five Misspelled Idioms

Some idioms are confused in the speaking; others just in the spelling. The following idioms are usually pronounced correctly, but they are often misspelled in writing.

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Beginning a Sentence with And or But

Several opinions about what is permissible in writing have acquired an almost religious authority with some English speakers. One of these opinions is that beginning a sentence with the coordinating conjunctions and and but is an unpardonable breach of usage.

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Conjunctive Adverbs

Conjunctions are words that link words, phrases, and clauses and provide a smooth transition between ideas. Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. Some adverbs can also join or show connections between ideas. When they do this, they are called conjunctive adverbs.

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Advance vs. Advanced

A reader has asked for a post on the incorrect use of advanced in the sense of advance. Both words are used with an assortment of meanings. This post will focus on only two.

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The Suffix -esque

The suffix -esque is frequently used by pop-culture writers who enjoy making adjectives from celebrity names: Paris Hilton dons Madonna-esque fingerless gloves as she takes to the decks in Washington.

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Innuendo

The word innuendo derives from a Latin verb meaning “to nod to, to signify.” As a legal term in the Middle Ages, innuendo was used to introduce the explanation of a word that was previously uncertain.

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Avoid Awkward Joint Possessives

Sometimes the best way to deal with conundrums of jointly owned possessions is to retreat and rewrite, especially when one of the owners is represented by a pronoun.

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