12 More Military Terms Used in Civilian Contexts

Following up on a post about words that originally pertained (or in one sense pertain) to military units but have developed nonmilitary connotations based on that sense, here are additional terms referring to military individuals or groups that have civilian senses as well.

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3 Faulty Constructions of In-Line Lists

The interrelationship of words or phrases in a list of things set out in a sentence (known as an in-line list, as opposed to a vertical list) is often obscured by erroneous syntax. For each of the following examples, discussion and revision point out the errors of equivalency.

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The “Guard” Family

Guard is the basis of a family of words pertaining to protection; these terms are listed and defined in the post below.

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Sacred Words

The words featured in this post have a word in common: the Latin adjective sacer, meaning “holy.”

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Punctuation with Parenthetical Phrasing

Parenthetical phrasing is often punctuated incorrectly, as shown in the following examples, each of which is followed by a discussion and a revision.

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Rules About Treatment of Numbers

The basic rule about referring to numbers, according to The Chicago Manual of Style, is to spell them out when the total is one hundred or less and use numerals for larger numbers (the Associated Press Stylebook and some other style handbooks set the cut-off point after nine), but there are many exceptions. This post outlines those exceptions.

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Capitalizing and Punctuating Quotations

Quotations consisting of complete sentences should always be capitalized, as explained in the discussions and shown in the revisions to the following examples. (Note, too, that each sentence has a punctuation error.)

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Still More Words That Turn on the Root “Vert”

Two recent posts dealt with many of the English words based on the Latin verb vertere, meaning “turn,” focusing on those based on the root vert. This follow-up post defines some additional words in the vertere family: those with the root vers.

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Pleasing Words

The Latin verb placere, meaning “be acceptable” or “be liked,” is the source of a number of English words pertaining to agreeability. This post lists and defines these terms.

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Hyphenation Rules for 35 Prefixes (and 1 Suffix)

There was a time when prefixes were routinely attached to root words with hyphens, but that time has, for the most part, passed. Now, hyphens are the exception, as detailed in the following list, which also provides simple definitions.

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