What Is a Doctor?

Exactly what does doctor mean, and who can call himself or herself a doctor, and who can’t? A discussion of the term and its origins and parameters follows.

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  • Mark Nichol on
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Words for Bodies of Lawmakers

This post discusses an assortment of words employed in English to refer to a group of people responsible for representing the general populace and passing laws, or to pertain to the room in which they meet to do so, or both.

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  • Mark Nichol on
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Assure—I Mean, Ensure—Good Writing

Once upon a time, professional and amateur writers alike could count on books and publications to help guide them in writing clearly, coherently, and concisely. They knew that when they opened a book, a magazine, or a newspaper, they could generally be assured that they would find carefully crafted prose that adhered to principles of proper grammar, syntax, and usage and would not only enhance comprehension of the content but also serve as a model for their own effective writing.

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DailyWritingTips Has a YouTube Channel Now

We are always looking for new ways to distribute our content and to interact with our audience. That is why we decided to launch a YouTube channel, featuring short videos with grammar, punctuation and spelling tips.

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5 Sentences with Misplaced Modifiers

In each of the following sentences, ambiguity or confusion results from faulty placement of a modifying phrase. Discussion and a revision of each sentence illustrates a solution to the problem.

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  • Mark Nichol on
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5 Points About Parallel Structure

The following five sentences present various problems with sentence organization. Each is followed by a discussion of the sentence and a revision that addresses the problem.

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3 Strategies for Combining Sentences

One approach to making prose more concise is to stitch together two related sentences by revising one so that it serves as a subordinate clause to the other rather than an independent statement. Here are three ways to accomplish this goal.

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  • Mark Nichol on
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Words Ending in -aire

A small class of English words derived from the Latin suffixes -arius/-aria/-arium, meaning “connected with” or “pertaining to,” can be identified by the French descendant -aire. Here is a summary of those terms as used in English.

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When to Abbreviate, Etc.

When is it appropriate to abbreviate words? The answer to this question, as with many matters in writing, is not a simple one: It depends on type of content and the degree of the content’s formality.

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Adjectives Synonymous with “Best”

A recent post discussed nouns employed to refer to ultimate achievement. Here, you’ll find details about adjectives that describe something that is the best, highest, or most important.

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5 Ways to Make a Sentence More Concise

Expressing oneself clearly and concisely in speech is a challenge because one has so little time to order one’s thoughts and choose one’s wording carefully, but writing is easily improved with even the briefest review. Always read over what you have written (whether it’s a tweet or a book manuscript) before you distribute or publish it—not only to adhere to the mechanical basics of grammar, syntax, usage, and style but also to check for narrative flow and conciseness. The following sentences, and the discussions and revisions that follow each one, include advice for paring unnecessary words and phrases.

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  • Mark Nichol on
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