Verbs in If Clauses Exercise (321)

The following sentences contain commonly heard errors in verb use with if clauses. Edit them to correct the errors in the if clauses.

Answers and Explanations

1.
Original: If she would have been faithful, I would have missed out on you.
Correct : If she had been faithful, I would have missed out on you.

When talking about something that did not happen in the past, use the past perfect in the if clause.

2.
Original: If they succeeded, we would not have this problem now.
Correct : If they had succeeded, we would not have this problem now.

When talking about something that did not happen in the past, use the past perfect in the if clause. The tense in the main clause makes it clear that the verb in the if clause belongs further in the past than the simple past.

3.
Original: I could have saved more money if Max would have cooperated with me.
Correct : I could have saved more money if Max had cooperated with me.

When talking about something that did not happen in the past, use the past perfect in the if clause.

4.
Original: If voters knew they’d lose insurance, Romney would have won.
Correct : If voters had known they’d lose insurance, Romney would have won.

When talking about something that did not happen in the past, use the past perfect.

5.
Original: If Cowboys didn’t trade up for Lawrence, they would have drafted Ealy and Turner.
Correct : If Cowboys hadn’t traded up for Lawrence, they would have drafted Ealy and Turner.

When talking about something that did not happen in the past, use the past perfect.

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