Phrasal Verbs Exercise (197)

Many phrasal verbs are used with different meanings in different contexts. Choose the best equivalent for the phrasal verbs in boldface.

  • When I ran into my boss at Sonic, I asked him for a raise.

  • The Memphis team showed up its competitor from Texas.

  • The nanny looked after two children and a dog.

  • The burglar made up a preposterous story for the police.

  • Churchill said he wouldn’t stand for frivolous criticism of his writing.

Answers and Explanations

1. When I ran into my boss at Sonic, I asked him for a raise.

Correct: unexpectedly met
"Ran into" can mean "collide with" in some contexts: The car ran into the truck.

2. The Memphis team showed up its competitor from Texas.

Correct: exposed as inferior
"Show up" can also mean "to arrive": Charlie showed up late, as usual.

3. The nanny looked after two children and a dog.

Correct: tended
In this context, "look after" means "tended" or "cared for." At a stretch, it could also mean "watch something as it recedes from sight."

4. The burglar made up a preposterous story for the police.

Correct: invented
In another context, "to make up" can also mean "to reconcile": Frankie and Johnnie made up after their latest quarrel.

5. Churchill said he wouldn’t stand for frivolous criticism of his writing.

Correct: tolerate
Another meaning of "to stand for" is "to represent." Superman is said "to stand for Truth, Justice, and the American Way."

Related Articles

Subscribe to our articles and exercises