How to Pronounce Mobile

By Maeve Maddox

A reader wonders about the American pronunciation of the word mobile:

When Americans refer to the thing that all of us carry around as our personal digital appendage, they rhyme it with “bill.” The rest of the
world (i.e., where I live) pronounce it to rhyme it with “bile.”

I’m not talking about the adjective “mobile,” but the noun “mobile,” short
for “mobile phone.” Does this have to do anything with the gas company
which sounds the same?

The word mobile functions as both an adjective and as a noun:

Adjective
The mobile technology may be a lot different in terms of the Internet platform, but they basically share a common medium: the Web.

—Americans pronounce the adjective mobile to rhyme with noble.

Noun
Sallie bought a darling Winnie-the-Pooh mobile to hang above the baby’s bed.

—Americans pronounce the noun mobile to rhyme with toe-heel (MOH-beel).

The city in Alabama is usually pronounced MOH-beel. Sometimes it is pronounced moh-BEEL.

The petroleum company spells its name Mobil and pronounces it MOH-bil. Its progenitor, Mobilgas, was founded in the 1920s; Americans were already pronouncing mobile to rhyme with noble.

So, when did those wretched Americans start mispronouncing mobile?

They didn’t.

British speakers shifted their pronunciation of words ending in -ile from a short vowel sound to a long one. OED lexicographer R. W. Burchfield noted, “The division didn’t become clear-cut until about 1900.”

This is how Charles Elster (The Big Book of Beastly Mispronunciations) puts it:

… throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, both British and American speakers pronounced -ile either with a short i (as in pill) or an obscure/silent i (as in fossil). For example, the English elocutionist John Walker, whose Critical Pronouncing Dictionary (1791) had a profound influence on both sides of the Atlantic well into the 19th century, favored the short i in nearly all -ile words, including juvenile, mercantile, and puerile, citing only chamomile, infantile, and reconcile as long i exceptions.

In the 20th century, Americans were less consistent in their customary preference than the British were in their newfound preference, and the long i made some inroads in American speech.

In regard to the question that prompted this post, Americans call those “personal digital appendages” neither MOH-biles nor MOH-bils. We call them cell phones.

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4 Responses to “How to Pronounce Mobile”

  • thebluebird11

    Haha, until I read your last comment, I was thinking, “Who here [in the US] calls cell phones ‘mobiles’?” 🙂
    Brought to mind some examples from both sides of the pond: Cher (“Gypsies, Tramps and Thieves”) sang about picking up a boy just south of Mobile (i.e. ‘moh-BEEL’ Alabama), while The Who sang about “Going Mobile” (‘MOE-byl’). Of course the pronunciation of a name does not necessarily correlate with anything else (Houston, TX vs Houston St, NYC).

  • MikeRose

    “—Americans pronounce the noun mobile to rhyme with toe-heel (MOH-beel). ”

    What? I can’t let this slide. Is this blanket statement based upon research limited to glimpses of a few televisions shows set in fictional southern towns with characters driving pickup trucks? And by golly gee, we are even sometimes referring to our mobile devices as “mobile devices.” Probably because they are. Probably because every other television commercial refers to them as “mobile devices,” too.

  • venqax

    The pronunciation of place names can be very arbitrary (the Alabama city is MOE-BEEL), but as for the pronunciation of -ile words, there are general rules. In SAE, the general rule is that words ending in the suffix -ile are pronounced ‘L. So MOB’l, FRAJ’l, VERSAT’l, JOOVEN’l, etc. RP stresses the last syllables of such words with the desert-isle sounding syllable. The word missile is always pronounced MISS’l, with the stress on the first syllable in American, after that, however, Americans tend to get very sloppy and random about it. I’ll regularly hear someone in the juvenile justice system talk about a certain jooven-ILE down at the JOOven’l justice center in the same sentence. And the Village MercanTILE is never the Village MERCant’l, thought it really should be. Hostile is usually pronounced host’l unless someone is being semi-comical for affect: “Don’t get all host-ILE, man, I was joking!” I don’t know why Americans have such commitment issues with the ISLE (aisle?) but it, like other proper pronunciation, isn’t taught much at all.

  • Sandra

    There’s some guy at work that actually pronounces it as to rhyme with “noble” and I’ve always pronounced it with a long “i”, that is why I googled this. He’s supposed to be an american citizen as far as I know.

    P.S. I write from Mexico.

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