Coordinating Conjunctions

By Andi

Coordinating conjunctions are some of the handiest, dandiest words in the English language. Essentially, they help us string our thoughts together in a way that is complex and meaningful, and without them writing would be very short and choppy.

You can remember the coordinating conjunctions by memorizing the word:

FANBOYS = for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so

Coordinating conjunctions are used between independent clauses, and paired with a comma. For example, the following sentences can be combined with a coordinating conjunction:

This place has the worst food I have ever tasted. I will never eat here again.

Combined with a comma and coordinating conjunction:

This place has the worst food I have ever tasted, so I will never eat here again.

Some other examples:

  • I love you, but I can not marry you.
  • I want to go to the store, and I want to go to her birthday party.
  • He had not known her long, yet he felt very close to her.

Coordinating conjunctions are some of the most commonly used words and very easily misused by leaving out a comma or putting it in the wrong place. Be mindful that the parts you join are complete sentences that can stand alone.

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16 Responses to “Coordinating Conjunctions”

  • Mark

    Hey,

    I think you meant that the FANBOYS are placed between independent clauses and not dependent. Because, “I love you” is an independent clause that can stay alone, and “I can not marry you” can remain on its own.

    Nice post about the FANBOYS.

  • Daniel

    Yes it was a typo Mark, thanks for the heads up.

  • Amy W.

    Also I’m sure you put the comma in the sentence, “Coordinating conjunctions are used between independent clauses, and paired with a comma,” only to find out which of your readers is an editor, since “paired with a comma” is hardly independent.

    Hmm. What about “since” and “because”?

  • Andy

    u can also Betty and Fred ordered some yellow noodles
    that stands for but, and, for, or, so, yet, nor

  • K.Vee.Shanker.

    It is helpful

  • Billy

    I vould veery much agree weeth K.Vee.Shanker

  • ejstar

    yeah i agree with mark

  • ejstar

    give me some examples of coordinating conjunctions..
    this is my project!

  • petra

    Please can you tell me the definition of complex coordinator and examples?

    thanx

  • khaye

    give me some examples of coordinating conjunction?

    pls.. cos dis is my assignment..

  • mark angelho

    give me also 20 examples of coordinating and corelative conjunction pls? tnx a lot!!!!!!

  • sandy

    I was told that you should use a comma before using the word “and”

  • shiela

    pls give more example of coordinating conjuction

  • jael

    aw! 150 examples of coordinating conjunctions
    i only have 100

  • claire

    thank you for helping to my assignment

  • Dean Bush

    Examples for using coordinating conjunctions (and, or, but, for, yet, so, nor):

    1. I am tired, and I am hungry. (“I am tired and hungry.” “And” in this second sentence is NOT a coordinating conjunction because the subject “I” is written only one time.)

    2. The book might be in the desk, or it might be in the car. (Two independent clauses or complete sentences connected by a comma and a coordinating conjunction word “or.”

    3. I don’t have a book, but the professor has a book.

    4. I can’t eat lunch today, for I don’t have enough money to buy lunch. (In this case, “for” means because.)

    5. I didn’t like the food, yet I ate it. (“Yet” and “but” basically the same thing.)

    6. I bought a car, so now I don’t have to ride the bus. (“So” means “because of that” or “for this reason.”)

    7. I don’t have any money, nor do I have any food. (Notice that after the word “nor,” the sentence begins with the verb “do.” This sentence means: I don’t have any money, and I don’t have any food.”)

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