Prepositional Phrases Exercise (579)

Revise each of the following sentences to produce the clearest use of the sentence's prepositional phrase.

Answers and Explanations

1.
Original: You’re welcome to pass on any information.
Correct : You’re welcome to pass any information on.

The original version is technically correct in conveying the sense of relaying information, but it could also be read as if "pass on" is being used as an idiom to mean "decide not to act on," whereas "pass any information on" is unambiguous.

2.
Original: Noticing that he had forgotten his briefcase, she ran into him at the airport.
Correct : Noticing that he had forgotten his briefcase, she ran in to him at the airport.

The correct usage depends on whether she is literally running with the goal of arriving where he is located ("She ran in to hand him the briefcase") or whether "ran" is being used as part of the idiom "ran into him" to indicate that she unexpectedly met him at a given location. The context here indicates that she ran in to him.

3.
Original: They jumped off of the bridge together into the river below.
Correct : They jumped off the bridge together into the river below.

Although "of" is frequently used conversationally in such statements, it is extraneous and should be avoided in writing in cases like this.

4.
Original: The software allows the app to be plugged in to any learning-management system with little programming.
Correct : The software allows the app to be plugged into any learning-management system with little programming.

Although "plug in" is a common verb phrase, here, the reference here is not to the action of plugging something in but rather to the state of being plugged into something.

5.
Original: He said he was stepping down out of his own free will.
Correct : He said he was stepping down of his own free will.

Here, "out" is superfluous (and distracting when following the directional term "down").

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