Capitalization Exercise (508)

Capitalize or lowercase words in each sentence to match correct style.

Answers and Explanations

1.
Original: Our team went to the State Championships last year, but we’re not exactly on Easy Street.
Correct : Our team went to the state championships last year, but we’re not exactly on Easy Street.

A description of an event, such as "the state championships" is just that—a description—and should not be capitalized unless the full, exact name of the event is used. "Easy Street," though not an actual thoroughfare, is capitalized as if it is one.

2.
Original: Even after fifty years, the Rolling Stones are going strong, and you’ll see that for yourself when they play at the Stadium later this year.
Correct : Even after fifty years, the Rolling Stones are going strong, and you’ll see that for yourself when they play at the stadium later this year.

"The" is almost never capitalized as part of a title, even if a band or another entity does so in its name. Exceptions are composition titles (such as those for films and books), though "the" in a newspaper title should be lowercase (and not italicized if the title itself is). A word for a building or structure is not capitalized except as part of the formal name.

3.
Original: My Mother watched as I practiced curtseying for the princess.
Correct : My mother watched as I practiced curtseying for the princess.

"Mother" and other similar designations are capitalized only in direct address ("I’m home, Mother!") or personifications ("It’s not nice to fool with Mother Nature"). "Princess" is capitalized only as a title before a name.

4.
Original: I’ve never been to the Appalachian mountains in the spring.
Correct : I’ve never been to the Appalachian Mountains in the spring.

Names of geographical features are capitalized when they are part of a name. Names of seasons are not capitalized.

5.
Original: That quote is from the Good Book, but I don’t remember whether it was said by one of the Apostles or a prophet.
Correct : That quote is from the Good Book, but I don’t remember whether it was said by one of the apostles or a prophet.

An epithet, or nickname, such as "the Good Book" as another name for the Bible, is capitalized, but terms such as "apostle" or "prophet" are not capitalized in general usage, though a religious organization may choose to style such a word that way in its own literature ("so says the Prophet").

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