Parts of Speech Exercise (328)

Identify the part of speech of the words in boldface.

  • I, having vainly begged the willful girl to rise and remove her wet things, left him preaching and her shivering, and betook myself to bed with little Hareton.

  • I joined my wail to theirs, loud and bitter; but Joseph asked what we could be thinking of to roar in that way over a saint in heaven.

  • Mrs. Linton sat in a loose, white dress, with a light shawl over her shoulders, in the recess of the open window, as usual.

  • "I must stop it," I muttered, knocking my knuckles through the glass, and stretching an arm out to seize the importunate branch; instead of which, my fingers closed on the fingers of a little, ice-cold hand!

  • The following evening was very wet; indeed it poured down till day-dawn; and, as I took my morning walk round the house, I observed the master’s window swinging open.

Answers and Explanations

1. I, having vainly begged the willful girl to rise and remove her wet things, left him preaching and her shivering, and betook myself to bed with little Hareton.

Correct: verb
Betook is the past tense of the verb betake. The expression "to betake oneself" is an old-fashioned way of saying "to make oneself do something." All of the sentences in this exercise are from Emily Brontë’s novel Wuthering Heights (1847).

2. I joined my wail to theirs, loud and bitter; but Joseph asked what we could be thinking of to roar in that way over a saint in heaven.

Correct: pronoun
Theirs is a possessive pronoun. The other possessive pronouns are: mine, yours, its, hers, his, and ours.

3. Mrs. Linton sat in a loose, white dress, with a light shawl over her shoulders, in the recess of the open window, as usual.

Correct: noun
Although recess may be used as a verb, as in "The judge recessed court until noon," in this context, a recess is an alcove, a space set back in a wall.

4. "I must stop it," I muttered, knocking my knuckles through the glass, and stretching an arm out to seize the importunate branch; instead of which, my fingers closed on the fingers of a little, ice-cold hand!

Correct: adjective
Although importunate may be used as a verb, as in, "The beggars importunate the customers as they leave the shop," in this context it is an adjective describing "branch." The speaker hears what he thinks is a tree branch scraping against his window as he is trying to sleep. The sense here is "persistently annoying."

5. The following evening was very wet; indeed it poured down till day-dawn; and, as I took my morning walk round the house, I observed the master’s window swinging open.

Correct: adverb
The meaning of indeed is "in truth, in actual fact."

Related Articles

Subscribe to our articles and exercises