65 Compound Words Ending in “Stone”

By Mark Nichol

Dozens of compound words, all but a few closed, end with the word stone, though some of the terms have figurative senses stemming from the original meaning and a few do not refer to actual types of rock at all. Here’s a list of most if not all compound words in which stone is the second element, with accompanying definitions.

1. birthstone: a gem symbolically associated with the month of one’s birth
2. bloodstone: a type of quartz with red spots that resemble drops of blood
3. bluestone: a bluish stone used in building
4. bondstone: a stone whose length is equal to the thickness of a wall that is placed in the wall to help strengthen it
5. brimstone: a traditional word for sulfur, chiefly used in the phrase “fire and brimstone,” referring to sermons in which churchgoers are dramatically warned about hell
6. brownstone: a building stone, and a type of house commonly clad with a layer of the stone
7. capstone: a slanted stone used on the top layer of a wall to allow water to drain off the top; also, figuratively refers to a high point in one’s experience or life
8. cherrystone: a type of clam
9. clingstone: a type of fruit with flesh connected to the stone, or pit
10. cobblestone: a round stone used to pave streets
11. copestone: see capstone
12. cornerstone: a stone placed on the corner of a building, including one traditionally inscribed with the date the building was constructed; also, figuratively refers to something of fundamental importance
13. coverstone: an aggregate of minerals used to cover treated pavement
14. curbstone: a stone, or concrete, used to form a curb
15. dripstone: a stone that projects over a door or window as an awning, or a stalactite or stalagmite made of calcium carbonate
16. drystone: in British English, an adjective describing a wall constructed of stone without mortar
17. fieldstone: a stone found in a field and used for some purpose without alteration
18. firestone: another word for flint (a type of quartz once used to start fires by sparking), or any stone impervious to high heat
19. flagstone: a flat, hard stone used to make paths
20. flintstone: pieces of flint used in construction
21. flowstone: a deposit of calcite formed by water running along or over a cave’s walls or floor
22. footstone: a stone placed at the foot of a grave
23. freestone: a stone able to be cut without splitting, or a stone, or pit, of a fruit not attached to the flesh or fruit with such a pit
24. gallstone: a hard object that forms in the gallbladder
25. gemstone: a stone of such quality that it can be used in jewelry
26. gladstone: a type of suitcase
27. goldstone: a type of glass to which particles of gold-colored material are applied
28. gravestone: a stone that marks the location of a grave and is often engraved with information about that person
29. greenstone: any of various greenish stones, such as a type of jade
30. grindstone: a turning stone wheel against which hard objects such as tools are smoothed or sharpened
31. hailstone: a piece of hail
32. headstone: see gravestone
33. hearthstone: a stone forming part of a hearth, or the floor or interior of a fireplace; also, figuratively, the home
34. holystone: a sandstone used to scrub a ship’s wooden decks
35. hornstone: a type of quartz resembling brittle flint
36. inkstone: a flat stone used as a palette in Chinese art and calligraphy
37. ironstone: a type of rock in which iron is found, or a type of pottery
38. keystone: a large stone at the apex of an arch used to hold the other stones in place; also, figuratively, something on which other things depend
39. lightstone: a grayish yellow
40. limestone: a white building stone
41. lodestone: a magnetic rock
42. merestone: a stone marking a boundary or serving as a landmark
43. milestone: a stone, inscribed with the distance to a specific place, located at the side of a road; also, figuratively, an important event or point of progress
44. millstone: one of two large, round, flat stones sandwiched together and rotated to grind grain; also, figuratively, a burdensome problem or responsibility
45. moonstone: feldspar used as a gem
46. mudstone: a shale formed from consolidated mud
47. oilstone: a whetstone for use with oil
48. philosopher’s stone: an imaginary substance supposedly able to transmute metals into gold
49. pipestone: a stone used for carving into objects (including pipes for smoking tobacco)
50. potstone: a mineral used by prehistoric humans to make cooking vessels
51. rhinestone: a stone resembling a diamond used in decoration and jewelry
52. rolling stone: a figurative term for an itinerant person
53. sandstone: a soft stone made of compacted sand
54. siltstone: a rock made of compacted silt
55. snakestone: any of several types of stones said to help heal a snakebite, a type of stone used in whetstones or for polishing, or a prehistoric shelled animal also known as an ammonite
56. soapstone: a soft stone formed mostly of talc
57. stepping stone: a large, flat stone in a shallow stream that one can step on to cross the water; also, figuratively, something that one can use to achieve a goal
58. toadstone: a stone, supposedly formed inside a toad, used as a charm or as an amulet against poison
59. tombstone: see gravestone
60. touchstone: originally, a small slab of dark stone on which a soft precious metal alloy would leave a trace when the alloy was rubbed against the stone, enabling assayers to evaluate the quality of the alloy; also, figuratively, something used as the basis for judging the quality of something else
61. turnstone: one of several types of birds
62. waterstone: a grindstone or millstone moistened with water instead of oil
63. whetstone: a stone used for sharpening blades
64. whinstone: basaltic rock or similar types of rocks
65. whitestone: an imitation gemstone such as a rhinestone

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2 Responses to “65 Compound Words Ending in “Stone””

  • Dale A. Wood

    O.K. there are always a few more: kidney stone (you know, if you have ever had one), fence-stone (used for making fences with – sometimes fieldstones). There are several different kinds of “stones” that are ores for metal in the technical world. “Goldstone” is one of them, and it is also the name of a noted geographical place: Goldstone, California.
    A nickname for a very stubborn person is “hardstone”. (It is in the dictionary.)
    There are proper nouns that were coined, especially when medieval governments ordered every citizen to have a surname: Goldstone (Goldstein), Pearlstone (Pearlstein), Rubystone (Rubenstein), Silverstone (Silverstein), Winestone (Winestein), Bluestone (Blaustein), Edelstein = “noble stone” in English. “Blackstone”, “Greystone”, and “Whitestone” come directly from English roots.
    Yellowstone is a geographical location in the northwestern United States.
    “Firestone” became a proper name in English, whence there came the Firestone rubber company, and for a long time, that one has been best known for making Firestone tires. Another noteworthy tire company is called Bridgestone.
    We can never forget the “Flintstone” family, which lived in the town of “Bedrock” among other people named “Slate” and “Rubble”.

  • Dale A. Wood

    I would not be surprised the find a word that means “anchor stone” because in ancient and medieval times, mariners used heavy stone objects for anchors, since metals were expensive and hard to get. In fact, there have been found some oddly-shaped stones off the coast of California – stones with holes drilled in them. Some people want to ascribe them to extraterrestrial visitors, but a more reasonable explanation is that these stones are anchor stones from medieval Chinese junks that crossed the Pacific. The Chinese mariners lost some of their anchors off California, and scuba divers find them sometimes.

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